title

The goop Podcast

Goop, Inc. and Cadence13

1.2K
Followers
10.1K
Plays
The goop Podcast

The goop Podcast

Goop, Inc. and Cadence13

1.2K
Followers
10.1K
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Details

About Us

Gwyneth Paltrow and goop's Chief Content Officer Elise Loehnen chat with leading thinkers, culture changers, and industry disruptors—from doctors to creatives, CEOs to spiritual healers—about shifting old paradigms and starting new conversations.

Latest Episodes

Decoupling Shame from Sexuality

“We can decouple shame from your sexuality,” says sex therapist Michael Vigorito. Vigorito joins Elise Loehnen to talk about how removing judgment can help us reframe our thinking about sex, desire, and the label: sex addiction. Vigorito prefers the term “out of control sexual behavior.” It doesn’t mean that someone is out of control, necessarily, but that they feel out of control. Often, Vigorito finds that problematic patterns of sexual behavior can be a disguise for other, deeply rooted issues—which he helps clients get curious about and untangle. In this episode, he also helps us carve out a space for ourselves, our partners, and even our children to feel safe while exploring the varied layers of sexuality. (For more, seeThe goop Podcast hub.)

52 MIN3 d ago
Comments
Decoupling Shame from Sexuality

Gwyneth Paltrow x Eckhart Tolle: Separating Ourselves from the Ego

“Most humans live as if past and future—and especially future—were more important than this moment,” says renowned spiritual leader Eckhart Tolle, author ofThe Power of NowandA New Earth. In this special conversation with GP, Tolle teaches us how to not resist our experience of the present moment, and why the feelings that we do resist have a way of—persisting. GP asks Tolle about the relationship between the ego and soul, and how we can come to see that we are not our thoughts. Tolle explains how we can release pain-bodies—an accumulation of old emotions. And of course they talk about the meaning of it all: “The world is not here to make you happy,” says Tolle. “It’s here to make you conscious.” (For more, seeThe goop Podcast hub. And check outthis free seven-day program with meditations by Tolleand Kim Eng.)

62 MIN5 d ago
Comments
Gwyneth Paltrow x Eckhart Tolle: Separating Ourselves from the Ego

Determining Your Life’s Purpose

“Do what only you can do with your particular talents, gifts, and flaws,”says Jennifer Freed, psychological astrologer and author ofUse Your Planets Wisely.In this episode, Freed joins friend Elise Loehnen to explain how we can use astrology to explore our own divine possibilities and potential. Freed reminds us that we are all a work in progress—moving away from primitive behaviors and toward our evolving selves is not a linear path. But regardless of how winding the path is, Freed believes we all have specific roles to play in making the world a better place. And that astrology can help us understand our roles—and show us new ways to relate and connect with other people. “Happiness isn’t in getting everything we want,” says Freed. “It’s having an experience of mattering to others.” (Formore,seeThe goop Podcast hub.)

46 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Determining Your Life’s Purpose

Why Certain Relationships Work

“Conflict is really what sharpens our ability to love,” says John Gottman, PhD, who is the cofounder, with his wife Julie, of the Gottman Institute for relationships. (They’re also coauthors of the new book,Eight Dates.)Today, they join Elise Loehnen to share the tools for communication and conflict resolution that make a relationship work. We learn about perpetual issues—and how to talk about them in a way that’s productive, instead of pushing them aside. Which doesn’t mean we get to change our partners—when we try to do this, problems tend to follow, say the Gottmans. “You don’t want to fall in love with who they want to be,” says John. “You want to fall in love with who they are.” And, according to the Gottmans, you want to build a wall around your relationship—rather than a wall between you and your partner. Oh, and find six seconds to make out every day.(Formore,seeThe goop Podcast hub.)

53 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Why Certain Relationships Work

Can We Slow Down The Aging Process?

“Only 20 percent of our longevity and health in old age is genetically determined,” saysDavidSinclair, “The rest is up to us.” The Harvard genetics professor and author ofLifespanjoins Elise Loehnen to break down the science behind the aging process and our well-being. He explains why it’s good for us to experience “biological stress,” how we can absolve harmful stress, and which supplements and health interventions he believes will keep us young, and which he predicts will forever change the future of medicine.(Formore,seeThe goop Podcast hub.)

53 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Can We Slow Down The Aging Process?

The Unexpected Upside of Movement

“Not only do we feel connected to one another, but we feel connected to something bigger than ourselves,” saysKellyMcGonigal, health psychologist, Stanford University lecturer, and author ofThe Joy of Movement.Collective joy,McGonigalsays, is what happens when we move our bodies in unison. It can help us reduce stress and anxiety, quiet our minds, maintain our health—and even makes us feel better about humanity. When we let go of the idea of exercise as something to help us lookbetter, we can tap into the pleasure of movement and feelgood. It is through moving our bodies,McGonigalhas found, that we are able to connect to our spirit and reveal our true selves. (Formore,seeThe goop Podcast hub.)

55 MIN2 w ago
Comments
The Unexpected Upside of Movement

Investigating Instead of Reacting

“Investigating what’s underneath the rage can help us then articulate—more clearly—our values,” saysRhondaV.Magee, professor of law at the University of San Francisco and author ofThe Inner Work of Racial Justice.Mageesat down with Elise Loehnen at In goop Health and gave a master class on how we can remain grounded,compassionate, andtrue toourselvesin a world that often feels complex, difficult, and divided. She teaches us how to explore our feelings based on what’s happening in our bodies, to reframe our thinking, and to learn what is sometimes hard for us to see. Keep listening to the end, whenMageeexplains how to use the four steps of RAIN: recognize, accept, investigate, non-identification.(Formore,seeThe goop Podcast hub.)

50 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Investigating Instead of Reacting

Why We Are Not Our Emotions

CleoWade—poet, activist, and author ofWhere to Begin—joins Elise Loehnen to talk about why she’s hopeful. She reminds us that simple words can turn into bigger actions. She helps us identify the things that get in our own way, which are often self-inflicted rules we impose on ourselves and each other that simply don’t work. We have a responsibility,Wadesays, to tell our stories—and to find ways to open up to the stories of others.(Formore,seeThe goop Podcast hub.)

42 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Why We Are Not Our Emotions

Recovering a Sacred Truth

“We’re not just fully human,” says theologian Meggan Watterson. “We’re also fully divine.” In her bookMary Magdalene Revealed, Watterson explains why the recovered gospel of this controversial figure—which was ordered to be destroyed in the fourth century—has the power to change the way we see our history, present, and future. Together, Watterson andEliseLoehnen examine the roots of femininity and how women throughout history have always grappled with their sense of self-worth. They talk about love, why we’re worthy of it, and our responsibility to express it: “What would love be,” Watterson asks, “if we didn’t have things to practice love on?” (Formore,seeThe goop Podcast hub.)

52 MIN2019 DEC 19
Comments
Recovering a Sacred Truth

How Important Is It to Be Likable?

“It’s not as simple as choosing not to care—you’re caught in a bind either way,” saysAliciaMenendez, MSNBC anchor and author ofThe Likeability Trap.Menendezjoins Elise Loehnen to talk about why many women are presented with two options: being a good leader or being liked. She urges us to stop responding to situations with the hope we will be more liked. And instead, she suggests that we ask ourselves whether we are being clear with our vision and executing it well. Through her research,Menendezhas identified principles that good leaders follow—which sometimes means making decisions that other people don’t like.(For more, seeThe goop Podcast hub.)

42 MIN2019 DEC 17
Comments
How Important Is It to Be Likable?

Latest Episodes

Decoupling Shame from Sexuality

“We can decouple shame from your sexuality,” says sex therapist Michael Vigorito. Vigorito joins Elise Loehnen to talk about how removing judgment can help us reframe our thinking about sex, desire, and the label: sex addiction. Vigorito prefers the term “out of control sexual behavior.” It doesn’t mean that someone is out of control, necessarily, but that they feel out of control. Often, Vigorito finds that problematic patterns of sexual behavior can be a disguise for other, deeply rooted issues—which he helps clients get curious about and untangle. In this episode, he also helps us carve out a space for ourselves, our partners, and even our children to feel safe while exploring the varied layers of sexuality. (For more, seeThe goop Podcast hub.)

52 MIN3 d ago
Comments
Decoupling Shame from Sexuality

Gwyneth Paltrow x Eckhart Tolle: Separating Ourselves from the Ego

“Most humans live as if past and future—and especially future—were more important than this moment,” says renowned spiritual leader Eckhart Tolle, author ofThe Power of NowandA New Earth. In this special conversation with GP, Tolle teaches us how to not resist our experience of the present moment, and why the feelings that we do resist have a way of—persisting. GP asks Tolle about the relationship between the ego and soul, and how we can come to see that we are not our thoughts. Tolle explains how we can release pain-bodies—an accumulation of old emotions. And of course they talk about the meaning of it all: “The world is not here to make you happy,” says Tolle. “It’s here to make you conscious.” (For more, seeThe goop Podcast hub. And check outthis free seven-day program with meditations by Tolleand Kim Eng.)

62 MIN5 d ago
Comments
Gwyneth Paltrow x Eckhart Tolle: Separating Ourselves from the Ego

Determining Your Life’s Purpose

“Do what only you can do with your particular talents, gifts, and flaws,”says Jennifer Freed, psychological astrologer and author ofUse Your Planets Wisely.In this episode, Freed joins friend Elise Loehnen to explain how we can use astrology to explore our own divine possibilities and potential. Freed reminds us that we are all a work in progress—moving away from primitive behaviors and toward our evolving selves is not a linear path. But regardless of how winding the path is, Freed believes we all have specific roles to play in making the world a better place. And that astrology can help us understand our roles—and show us new ways to relate and connect with other people. “Happiness isn’t in getting everything we want,” says Freed. “It’s having an experience of mattering to others.” (Formore,seeThe goop Podcast hub.)

46 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Determining Your Life’s Purpose

Why Certain Relationships Work

“Conflict is really what sharpens our ability to love,” says John Gottman, PhD, who is the cofounder, with his wife Julie, of the Gottman Institute for relationships. (They’re also coauthors of the new book,Eight Dates.)Today, they join Elise Loehnen to share the tools for communication and conflict resolution that make a relationship work. We learn about perpetual issues—and how to talk about them in a way that’s productive, instead of pushing them aside. Which doesn’t mean we get to change our partners—when we try to do this, problems tend to follow, say the Gottmans. “You don’t want to fall in love with who they want to be,” says John. “You want to fall in love with who they are.” And, according to the Gottmans, you want to build a wall around your relationship—rather than a wall between you and your partner. Oh, and find six seconds to make out every day.(Formore,seeThe goop Podcast hub.)

53 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Why Certain Relationships Work

Can We Slow Down The Aging Process?

“Only 20 percent of our longevity and health in old age is genetically determined,” saysDavidSinclair, “The rest is up to us.” The Harvard genetics professor and author ofLifespanjoins Elise Loehnen to break down the science behind the aging process and our well-being. He explains why it’s good for us to experience “biological stress,” how we can absolve harmful stress, and which supplements and health interventions he believes will keep us young, and which he predicts will forever change the future of medicine.(Formore,seeThe goop Podcast hub.)

53 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Can We Slow Down The Aging Process?

The Unexpected Upside of Movement

“Not only do we feel connected to one another, but we feel connected to something bigger than ourselves,” saysKellyMcGonigal, health psychologist, Stanford University lecturer, and author ofThe Joy of Movement.Collective joy,McGonigalsays, is what happens when we move our bodies in unison. It can help us reduce stress and anxiety, quiet our minds, maintain our health—and even makes us feel better about humanity. When we let go of the idea of exercise as something to help us lookbetter, we can tap into the pleasure of movement and feelgood. It is through moving our bodies,McGonigalhas found, that we are able to connect to our spirit and reveal our true selves. (Formore,seeThe goop Podcast hub.)

55 MIN2 w ago
Comments
The Unexpected Upside of Movement

Investigating Instead of Reacting

“Investigating what’s underneath the rage can help us then articulate—more clearly—our values,” saysRhondaV.Magee, professor of law at the University of San Francisco and author ofThe Inner Work of Racial Justice.Mageesat down with Elise Loehnen at In goop Health and gave a master class on how we can remain grounded,compassionate, andtrue toourselvesin a world that often feels complex, difficult, and divided. She teaches us how to explore our feelings based on what’s happening in our bodies, to reframe our thinking, and to learn what is sometimes hard for us to see. Keep listening to the end, whenMageeexplains how to use the four steps of RAIN: recognize, accept, investigate, non-identification.(Formore,seeThe goop Podcast hub.)

50 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Investigating Instead of Reacting

Why We Are Not Our Emotions

CleoWade—poet, activist, and author ofWhere to Begin—joins Elise Loehnen to talk about why she’s hopeful. She reminds us that simple words can turn into bigger actions. She helps us identify the things that get in our own way, which are often self-inflicted rules we impose on ourselves and each other that simply don’t work. We have a responsibility,Wadesays, to tell our stories—and to find ways to open up to the stories of others.(Formore,seeThe goop Podcast hub.)

42 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Why We Are Not Our Emotions

Recovering a Sacred Truth

“We’re not just fully human,” says theologian Meggan Watterson. “We’re also fully divine.” In her bookMary Magdalene Revealed, Watterson explains why the recovered gospel of this controversial figure—which was ordered to be destroyed in the fourth century—has the power to change the way we see our history, present, and future. Together, Watterson andEliseLoehnen examine the roots of femininity and how women throughout history have always grappled with their sense of self-worth. They talk about love, why we’re worthy of it, and our responsibility to express it: “What would love be,” Watterson asks, “if we didn’t have things to practice love on?” (Formore,seeThe goop Podcast hub.)

52 MIN2019 DEC 19
Comments
Recovering a Sacred Truth

How Important Is It to Be Likable?

“It’s not as simple as choosing not to care—you’re caught in a bind either way,” saysAliciaMenendez, MSNBC anchor and author ofThe Likeability Trap.Menendezjoins Elise Loehnen to talk about why many women are presented with two options: being a good leader or being liked. She urges us to stop responding to situations with the hope we will be more liked. And instead, she suggests that we ask ourselves whether we are being clear with our vision and executing it well. Through her research,Menendezhas identified principles that good leaders follow—which sometimes means making decisions that other people don’t like.(For more, seeThe goop Podcast hub.)

42 MIN2019 DEC 17
Comments
How Important Is It to Be Likable?

More from Goop, Inc. and Cadence13

Show

Playlists

Stress Relief
Team Himalaya
DEPRESSION
Aviva Gabriel
Soul 2
Jessica Wiser
Marriage & Intimacy
Eevdvm
hmly
himalayaプレミアムへようこそ聴き放題のオーディオブックをお楽しみください。