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Politics with Amy Walter

WNYC

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Followers
144
Plays
Politics with Amy Walter

Politics with Amy Walter

WNYC

53
Followers
144
Plays
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About Us

Every Friday, Amy Walter brings you the trends in politics long before the national media picks up on them. Known as one of the smartest and most trusted journalists in Washington, D.C., Amy Walter is respected by politicians and pundits on all sides of the aisle. You may know Amy her from her work with Cook Political Report and the PBS NewsHour where she looks beyond the breaking news headlines for a deeper understanding of how Washington works, who's pulling the levers of power, and how it all impacts you.Politics with Amy Walter is a co-production of PRI and WNYC Radio in collaboration WGBH.

Latest Episodes

A Look at Pennsylvania and 2020's Battleground States

With caucus and primary season around the corner, it’s only a matter of time until candidates shift gears and begin expanding their campaigns in battleground states. Come November, voters in states like Pennsylvania, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin will play a critical role in determining what party will take the White House. Although Pennsylvania handed President Obama victories in 2008 and 2012, voters decided to take a chance on President Trump in 2016, awarding him 20 electoral votes. This week, Politics with Amy Walter traveled to Pennsylvania to hear from politicians in the state about the lessons learned from 2016 and what’s at stake in 2020.Congressman Brendan Boyle,Congressman Dwight Evans, and PhiladelphiaCouncilmember Kendra Brookssat down with Amy Walter. Plus, Jerome Dillard, the State Director forEx-Incarcerated People Organizing(EXPO), highlights the implications of failing to engage disenfranchised voters. Also, the New York Times’Margot Sanger-Katzexplains the Republican-led lawsuit that attemptstodismantle the Affordable Care Act and what that means for the 20 million Americans that would lose coverage. Finally,Steve Mistler, Chief Political Correspondent of Maine Public Radio, weighs in on Senator Susan Collins’ legacy and how it might change in light of the ongoing impeachment trial.

51 MIN1 d ago
Comments
A Look at Pennsylvania and 2020's Battleground States

How are Republicans and Democrats Approaching Campaigning on Facebook in 2020?

Tech giants like Facebook, Twitter, and Google have redefined the way both Republicans and Democrats approach digital campaign outreach and fundraising. However, calls toregulate social media platformsgrew louder after evidence surfaced that nefarious actors attempted to use social media to influence thelast US presidential election. While Twitter recently announced that it would no longer run political advertisements, Facebook has moved in the opposite direction.Earlier this week, Facebook announced that itwould continue to allow political advertisements on the platform, even ads containing false information. PatrickRuffini,co-founder of Echelon Insightsand Tara McGowan, CEO and founder of Acronym, join Politics with Amy Walter to discuss what both parties have learned since 2016 about using social media platforms to target voters for fundraising.

16 MIN1 w ago
Comments
How are Republicans and Democrats Approaching Campaigning on Facebook in 2020?

Iran, Impeachment, and Iowa

Against the background of impeachment, heightened tensions with Iran, and the Iowa Caucuses,Astead Herndonof The New York Times andClare Maloneof FiveThirtyEight join Politics with Amy Walter to provide an update on the state of the Democratic Primary. Plus,Thanassis Cambanisof the Century Foundation analyzes the future of the US-Iran relationship in light of the assassination ofMajor General Qassim SoleimaniandAndrew Clevengerof CQ Roll Call provides context about the War Powers Resolution.

31 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Iran, Impeachment, and Iowa

What's next for Trump and Saudi Arabia?

On Thursday, presidential candidates seeking the Democratic nomination gathered in Los Angeles for the sixth debate. Maya Kingof Politico and Kevin Robillardof HuffPost join Politics with Amy Walter with analysis of the state of the Democratic primary field. Also,Toluse Olorunnipaof The Washington Post recaps President Trump's time in office as we head into 2020 andJesse Paulof the Colorado Sun weighs in on how vulnerable Republicans in the Senate are thinkingabout 2020. Plus,Nader Hashemiof theCenter for Middle East Studies andSenator Chris Murphyprovide context regarding the past and present of the United State's relationship with Saudi Arabia. Click on the 'Listen' button above to hear this segment. Don't have time to listen right now? Subscribe for free to our podcastvia iTunes,TuneIn,Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts to take this segment with you on the go. Want to comment on this story? Share your thoughts on ourFacebook pageorTwitter.

46 MIN2019 DEC 21
Comments
What's next for Trump and Saudi Arabia?

The Political Power of Women

This week,Nick Fandosjoined Politics with Amy Walter to share the latest about the House's impeachment vote. But while the national media has been saturated with impeachment, Democratic candidates are focused on Iowa, where voters will cast their ballots in the new year.Tiffany Muller,President and Executive Director of End Citizens United andMichael McAdams,National Press Secretary of the National Republican Congressional Committee, weigh in on how the two parties vision impeachment playing out in 2020 and the messages they're relaying to their separatebases. Also, The Washington Post'sHeather Longdiscusses why it's rare to hearabout theloss of administrative jobs that were primarily held by women. The president of the Voter Participation Center,Page Gardner, explains why presidential candidates should harness the voting power of unmarried women.

47 MIN2019 DEC 14
Comments
The Political Power of Women

The State of the Democratic Primary Field

The road to the White House is rarely a linear path. That was abundantly clear this week when Senator Kamala Harris announced that she was suspending her campaign. The announcement came as a surprise to many because at the time of launch, Senator Harris was one to watch.Political reportersDarren Sands,Laura Barron-Lopez, andMaya Kingjoin us to discussthe end of her campaign and what challenges the DemocraticParty faces in putting forth the best candidate. Also,Congressman Krishnamoorthiprovides an update on the impeachment inquiry.Finally,Caitlin ZaloomandAlia Wongdescribe how college went from being accessible to burdensome and expensive.

45 MIN2019 DEC 7
Comments
The State of the Democratic Primary Field

The Politics of Climate Change

Scientists have painted a bleak picture of the future if we fail to curb greenhouse gas emissions, but we’ve already started to witness the fallout ofa warming planet. Politics with Amy Walter looks at the role climate change is playingacross politics and at the vulnerable communities that stand to lose the most. Our coverage this week is part of a collaboration with 250 other media organizations called “Covering Climate Now.” President Donald Trump was elected in 2016 fresh off of giving campaignspeeches that promised to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris Climate Agreement and bring back coal jobs. Just over two years later, we look atwhether or not he's made good on those promises. Guests: Rachel Cleetus,Policy director with the Climate and Energy program at the Union of Concerned Scientists Kendra Pierre-Louis, Climate reporter for The New York Times Christine Todd Whitman, FormerGovernor of New Jersey and Former Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency Zahra Hirji,C...

44 MIN2019 NOV 30
Comments
The Politics of Climate Change

The Divided States of Government

Not that long ago, state government was seen as one of the last places for functional governing. But, over the last 10 years, state politics have become as polarized as Washington, DC. At the same time,2020 Democratic candidates for president are debating which approach they should take to governing. Some, like former Vice President Joe Biden, argue that voters want a return to a more pragmatic style of governing. Senators Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders are less interested in bringing GOP legislators to the table than they are in bringing a grass-roots revolution to Washington. Wisconsin State SenatorJanet Bewleyjoins us to discuss what it's like to govern in the minority.Governing reporterAlan Greenblattweighs in about how state legislatures have becomeincreasingly entrenched in party politics. Political analystsJoel PayneandTy Mastdrofjoin us for analysis of the last debate. Plus, New York Times congressional reporterNick Fandosfills us in on the latest surrounding the impeac...

48 MIN2019 NOV 23
Comments
The Divided States of Government

The Impeachment Will Be Televised

This week marked a shift in the ongoing impeachment inquiry as the first round of televised testimony began on Wednesday.Marie Yovanovitch, the well-respected former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine until May of this year became the third televised testimony onFriday.Yovanovitch believes she was removed from her postby President Trump because as she sees it, she was impeding his - and Rudy Guiliani’s - personal political agenda. While the televised inquiry didn't reveal much new information, it provided an opportunity for those watching from home to hear fromlong-time government civil servants involved in Ukrainian foreign policy.Amanda Terkelfrom HuffPost andAnita Kumarfrom Politico join Politics with Amy Walter to discuss the latest on impeachment. PollsterKristen Soltis Andersonweighs in on public opinion surroundingthe President and the inquiry. Barbara Perryof the University of Virginia's Miller Center describes how social media and the 24-hournews cycle changes how Americans metabo...

46 MIN2019 NOV 16
Comments
The Impeachment Will Be Televised

What Did Democrats Get Wrong About Religious Voters in 2016?

Arecent studyfrom Pew Research found that white people who identify as Christians represent about two-thirds of all Republicans. Meanwhile, Americans unaffiliated with any religion, and racial minorities who identify as Christians, now each make up a bigger share of the Democratic coalition. This week, we take a look athow people of faith are balancing their religious beliefs with politics. The Atlantic'sEmma Greenexplains what Democrats misunderstood about religious voters in 2016. ReverendJoe DarbyofNichols Chapel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina talks to us about what he's hearing from his congregation in the early-primary state. PastorBart BarberofFirst Baptist Church in Farmersville, Texas joins us to discuss Evangelical support for President Trump in 2016.Doug Pagitt,pastor and executive director of Vote Common Good, discusses his campaign to ask Evangelicals and Christians to consider Democratic candidates. Finally,Congresswoman Elaine Luriaof Virginia's second distri...

45 MIN2019 NOV 9
Comments
What Did Democrats Get Wrong About Religious Voters in 2016?

Latest Episodes

A Look at Pennsylvania and 2020's Battleground States

With caucus and primary season around the corner, it’s only a matter of time until candidates shift gears and begin expanding their campaigns in battleground states. Come November, voters in states like Pennsylvania, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin will play a critical role in determining what party will take the White House. Although Pennsylvania handed President Obama victories in 2008 and 2012, voters decided to take a chance on President Trump in 2016, awarding him 20 electoral votes. This week, Politics with Amy Walter traveled to Pennsylvania to hear from politicians in the state about the lessons learned from 2016 and what’s at stake in 2020.Congressman Brendan Boyle,Congressman Dwight Evans, and PhiladelphiaCouncilmember Kendra Brookssat down with Amy Walter. Plus, Jerome Dillard, the State Director forEx-Incarcerated People Organizing(EXPO), highlights the implications of failing to engage disenfranchised voters. Also, the New York Times’Margot Sanger-Katzexplains the Republican-led lawsuit that attemptstodismantle the Affordable Care Act and what that means for the 20 million Americans that would lose coverage. Finally,Steve Mistler, Chief Political Correspondent of Maine Public Radio, weighs in on Senator Susan Collins’ legacy and how it might change in light of the ongoing impeachment trial.

51 MIN1 d ago
Comments
A Look at Pennsylvania and 2020's Battleground States

How are Republicans and Democrats Approaching Campaigning on Facebook in 2020?

Tech giants like Facebook, Twitter, and Google have redefined the way both Republicans and Democrats approach digital campaign outreach and fundraising. However, calls toregulate social media platformsgrew louder after evidence surfaced that nefarious actors attempted to use social media to influence thelast US presidential election. While Twitter recently announced that it would no longer run political advertisements, Facebook has moved in the opposite direction.Earlier this week, Facebook announced that itwould continue to allow political advertisements on the platform, even ads containing false information. PatrickRuffini,co-founder of Echelon Insightsand Tara McGowan, CEO and founder of Acronym, join Politics with Amy Walter to discuss what both parties have learned since 2016 about using social media platforms to target voters for fundraising.

16 MIN1 w ago
Comments
How are Republicans and Democrats Approaching Campaigning on Facebook in 2020?

Iran, Impeachment, and Iowa

Against the background of impeachment, heightened tensions with Iran, and the Iowa Caucuses,Astead Herndonof The New York Times andClare Maloneof FiveThirtyEight join Politics with Amy Walter to provide an update on the state of the Democratic Primary. Plus,Thanassis Cambanisof the Century Foundation analyzes the future of the US-Iran relationship in light of the assassination ofMajor General Qassim SoleimaniandAndrew Clevengerof CQ Roll Call provides context about the War Powers Resolution.

31 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Iran, Impeachment, and Iowa

What's next for Trump and Saudi Arabia?

On Thursday, presidential candidates seeking the Democratic nomination gathered in Los Angeles for the sixth debate. Maya Kingof Politico and Kevin Robillardof HuffPost join Politics with Amy Walter with analysis of the state of the Democratic primary field. Also,Toluse Olorunnipaof The Washington Post recaps President Trump's time in office as we head into 2020 andJesse Paulof the Colorado Sun weighs in on how vulnerable Republicans in the Senate are thinkingabout 2020. Plus,Nader Hashemiof theCenter for Middle East Studies andSenator Chris Murphyprovide context regarding the past and present of the United State's relationship with Saudi Arabia. Click on the 'Listen' button above to hear this segment. Don't have time to listen right now? Subscribe for free to our podcastvia iTunes,TuneIn,Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts to take this segment with you on the go. Want to comment on this story? Share your thoughts on ourFacebook pageorTwitter.

46 MIN2019 DEC 21
Comments
What's next for Trump and Saudi Arabia?

The Political Power of Women

This week,Nick Fandosjoined Politics with Amy Walter to share the latest about the House's impeachment vote. But while the national media has been saturated with impeachment, Democratic candidates are focused on Iowa, where voters will cast their ballots in the new year.Tiffany Muller,President and Executive Director of End Citizens United andMichael McAdams,National Press Secretary of the National Republican Congressional Committee, weigh in on how the two parties vision impeachment playing out in 2020 and the messages they're relaying to their separatebases. Also, The Washington Post'sHeather Longdiscusses why it's rare to hearabout theloss of administrative jobs that were primarily held by women. The president of the Voter Participation Center,Page Gardner, explains why presidential candidates should harness the voting power of unmarried women.

47 MIN2019 DEC 14
Comments
The Political Power of Women

The State of the Democratic Primary Field

The road to the White House is rarely a linear path. That was abundantly clear this week when Senator Kamala Harris announced that she was suspending her campaign. The announcement came as a surprise to many because at the time of launch, Senator Harris was one to watch.Political reportersDarren Sands,Laura Barron-Lopez, andMaya Kingjoin us to discussthe end of her campaign and what challenges the DemocraticParty faces in putting forth the best candidate. Also,Congressman Krishnamoorthiprovides an update on the impeachment inquiry.Finally,Caitlin ZaloomandAlia Wongdescribe how college went from being accessible to burdensome and expensive.

45 MIN2019 DEC 7
Comments
The State of the Democratic Primary Field

The Politics of Climate Change

Scientists have painted a bleak picture of the future if we fail to curb greenhouse gas emissions, but we’ve already started to witness the fallout ofa warming planet. Politics with Amy Walter looks at the role climate change is playingacross politics and at the vulnerable communities that stand to lose the most. Our coverage this week is part of a collaboration with 250 other media organizations called “Covering Climate Now.” President Donald Trump was elected in 2016 fresh off of giving campaignspeeches that promised to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris Climate Agreement and bring back coal jobs. Just over two years later, we look atwhether or not he's made good on those promises. Guests: Rachel Cleetus,Policy director with the Climate and Energy program at the Union of Concerned Scientists Kendra Pierre-Louis, Climate reporter for The New York Times Christine Todd Whitman, FormerGovernor of New Jersey and Former Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency Zahra Hirji,C...

44 MIN2019 NOV 30
Comments
The Politics of Climate Change

The Divided States of Government

Not that long ago, state government was seen as one of the last places for functional governing. But, over the last 10 years, state politics have become as polarized as Washington, DC. At the same time,2020 Democratic candidates for president are debating which approach they should take to governing. Some, like former Vice President Joe Biden, argue that voters want a return to a more pragmatic style of governing. Senators Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders are less interested in bringing GOP legislators to the table than they are in bringing a grass-roots revolution to Washington. Wisconsin State SenatorJanet Bewleyjoins us to discuss what it's like to govern in the minority.Governing reporterAlan Greenblattweighs in about how state legislatures have becomeincreasingly entrenched in party politics. Political analystsJoel PayneandTy Mastdrofjoin us for analysis of the last debate. Plus, New York Times congressional reporterNick Fandosfills us in on the latest surrounding the impeac...

48 MIN2019 NOV 23
Comments
The Divided States of Government

The Impeachment Will Be Televised

This week marked a shift in the ongoing impeachment inquiry as the first round of televised testimony began on Wednesday.Marie Yovanovitch, the well-respected former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine until May of this year became the third televised testimony onFriday.Yovanovitch believes she was removed from her postby President Trump because as she sees it, she was impeding his - and Rudy Guiliani’s - personal political agenda. While the televised inquiry didn't reveal much new information, it provided an opportunity for those watching from home to hear fromlong-time government civil servants involved in Ukrainian foreign policy.Amanda Terkelfrom HuffPost andAnita Kumarfrom Politico join Politics with Amy Walter to discuss the latest on impeachment. PollsterKristen Soltis Andersonweighs in on public opinion surroundingthe President and the inquiry. Barbara Perryof the University of Virginia's Miller Center describes how social media and the 24-hournews cycle changes how Americans metabo...

46 MIN2019 NOV 16
Comments
The Impeachment Will Be Televised

What Did Democrats Get Wrong About Religious Voters in 2016?

Arecent studyfrom Pew Research found that white people who identify as Christians represent about two-thirds of all Republicans. Meanwhile, Americans unaffiliated with any religion, and racial minorities who identify as Christians, now each make up a bigger share of the Democratic coalition. This week, we take a look athow people of faith are balancing their religious beliefs with politics. The Atlantic'sEmma Greenexplains what Democrats misunderstood about religious voters in 2016. ReverendJoe DarbyofNichols Chapel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina talks to us about what he's hearing from his congregation in the early-primary state. PastorBart BarberofFirst Baptist Church in Farmersville, Texas joins us to discuss Evangelical support for President Trump in 2016.Doug Pagitt,pastor and executive director of Vote Common Good, discusses his campaign to ask Evangelicals and Christians to consider Democratic candidates. Finally,Congresswoman Elaine Luriaof Virginia's second distri...

45 MIN2019 NOV 9
Comments
What Did Democrats Get Wrong About Religious Voters in 2016?
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