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The Guardian's Audio Long Reads

The Guardian

488
Followers
3.1K
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The Guardian's Audio Long Reads

The Guardian's Audio Long Reads

The Guardian

488
Followers
3.1K
Plays
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About Us

The Audio Long Reads podcast is a selection of the  Guardian’s long reads, giving you the opportunity to get on with your day while listening to some of the finest journalism the Guardian has to offer, including in-depth writing from around the world on immigration, crime, business, the arts and much more

Latest Episodes

Why WeWork went wrong

The office-space startup took a tumble when investors tired of its messianic CEO and lack of profits. But why were its backers – the House of Saud among them – so keen to pour billions into it in the first place? By Matthew Zeitlin. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

27 MIN2 d ago
Comments
Why WeWork went wrong

Snow machines and fleece blankets: inside the ski industry’s battle with climate change

Hundreds of ski resorts now stand abandoned across the Alps. But some scientists believe they have found a way to keep snow on the ground – and that it could help vulnerable communities all over the world. By Simon Parkin. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

26 MIN6 d ago
Comments
Snow machines and fleece blankets: inside the ski industry’s battle with climate change

‘Humans were not centre stage’: how ancient cave art puts us in our place

In our self-obsessed age, the anonymous, mysterious cave art of our ancient ancestors is exhilarating. By Barbara Ehrenreich. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

33 MIN1 w ago
Comments
‘Humans were not centre stage’: how ancient cave art puts us in our place

The age of perpetual crisis: how the 2010s disrupted everything but resolved nothing

In an era of bewildering upheaval, how will the past decade be remembered? By Andy Beckett. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

34 MIN1 w ago
Comments
The age of perpetual crisis: how the 2010s disrupted everything but resolved nothing

The making of a bedsit Nazi: who was the man who killed Jo Cox?

Three years after the MP’s murder, many questions remain unanswered. By Kester Aspden. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

33 MIN2 w ago
Comments
The making of a bedsit Nazi: who was the man who killed Jo Cox?

Best audio long reads of 2019: the Anthropocene epoch

Have we entered a new phase of planetary history? Human activity has transformed the Earth – but scientists are divided about whether this is really a turning point in geological history. By Nicola Davison. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

38 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Best audio long reads of 2019: the Anthropocene epoch

Best audio long reads of 2019: my infant son’s struggle with food

After her son was born prematurely, Tahmima Anam thought the worst was behind her. But when he was allowed to come home two months later, a new problem emerged: he refused to eat. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

49 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Best audio long reads of 2019: my infant son’s struggle with food

Best audio long reads of 2019: Hand dryers v paper towels

For a century, the humble paper towel has dominated public toilets. But a new generation of hand dryers has sparked a war for loo supremacy. By Samanth Subramanian. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

39 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Best audio long reads of 2019: Hand dryers v paper towels

‘I've seen death in this city, but nothing as sad as this’: how a ferry disaster exposed the corruption devastating Iraq

EAs protests against a rotten system continue, the families of 128 drowned civilians await justice. By Ghaith Abdul-Ahad. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

32 MIN2019 DEC 20
Comments
‘I've seen death in this city, but nothing as sad as this’: how a ferry disaster exposed the corruption devastating Iraq

People v mosquitos: what to do about our biggest killer

These tiny pests adapt so successfully to changing conditions that they have become humankind’s deadliest predator. We might soon be able to eradicate them – but should we? By Timothy Winegard. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

26 MIN2019 DEC 16
Comments
People v mosquitos: what to do about our biggest killer

Latest Episodes

Why WeWork went wrong

The office-space startup took a tumble when investors tired of its messianic CEO and lack of profits. But why were its backers – the House of Saud among them – so keen to pour billions into it in the first place? By Matthew Zeitlin. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

27 MIN2 d ago
Comments
Why WeWork went wrong

Snow machines and fleece blankets: inside the ski industry’s battle with climate change

Hundreds of ski resorts now stand abandoned across the Alps. But some scientists believe they have found a way to keep snow on the ground – and that it could help vulnerable communities all over the world. By Simon Parkin. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

26 MIN6 d ago
Comments
Snow machines and fleece blankets: inside the ski industry’s battle with climate change

‘Humans were not centre stage’: how ancient cave art puts us in our place

In our self-obsessed age, the anonymous, mysterious cave art of our ancient ancestors is exhilarating. By Barbara Ehrenreich. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

33 MIN1 w ago
Comments
‘Humans were not centre stage’: how ancient cave art puts us in our place

The age of perpetual crisis: how the 2010s disrupted everything but resolved nothing

In an era of bewildering upheaval, how will the past decade be remembered? By Andy Beckett. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

34 MIN1 w ago
Comments
The age of perpetual crisis: how the 2010s disrupted everything but resolved nothing

The making of a bedsit Nazi: who was the man who killed Jo Cox?

Three years after the MP’s murder, many questions remain unanswered. By Kester Aspden. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

33 MIN2 w ago
Comments
The making of a bedsit Nazi: who was the man who killed Jo Cox?

Best audio long reads of 2019: the Anthropocene epoch

Have we entered a new phase of planetary history? Human activity has transformed the Earth – but scientists are divided about whether this is really a turning point in geological history. By Nicola Davison. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

38 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Best audio long reads of 2019: the Anthropocene epoch

Best audio long reads of 2019: my infant son’s struggle with food

After her son was born prematurely, Tahmima Anam thought the worst was behind her. But when he was allowed to come home two months later, a new problem emerged: he refused to eat. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

49 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Best audio long reads of 2019: my infant son’s struggle with food

Best audio long reads of 2019: Hand dryers v paper towels

For a century, the humble paper towel has dominated public toilets. But a new generation of hand dryers has sparked a war for loo supremacy. By Samanth Subramanian. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

39 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Best audio long reads of 2019: Hand dryers v paper towels

‘I've seen death in this city, but nothing as sad as this’: how a ferry disaster exposed the corruption devastating Iraq

EAs protests against a rotten system continue, the families of 128 drowned civilians await justice. By Ghaith Abdul-Ahad. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

32 MIN2019 DEC 20
Comments
‘I've seen death in this city, but nothing as sad as this’: how a ferry disaster exposed the corruption devastating Iraq

People v mosquitos: what to do about our biggest killer

These tiny pests adapt so successfully to changing conditions that they have become humankind’s deadliest predator. We might soon be able to eradicate them – but should we? By Timothy Winegard. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

26 MIN2019 DEC 16
Comments
People v mosquitos: what to do about our biggest killer
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