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Freedom, Books, Flowers & the Moon

the TLS

254
Followers
389
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Freedom, Books, Flowers & the Moon

Freedom, Books, Flowers & the Moon

the TLS

254
Followers
389
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

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About Us

A weekly culture and ideas podcast brought to you by the Times Literary Supplement.

Latest Episodes

How to be alone

The poet and novelist Adam Foulds on the evolution of loneliness and its traditionally privileged cousin, solitude; Sam Leith on thrills, spills and racism in Willard Price’s children’sAdventureseries; Molly Guinness dips into 300-odd years of children’s books and finds leaden instruction, radical ideas and pure nonsense A History of Solitude by David Vincent A Biography of Loneliness: The history of an emotion by Fay Bound Alberti Discovering Children’s Books, the British Library online British Literature Catalogue, Peter Harrington See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

56 MIN6 d ago
Comments
How to be alone

Townies and gownies

Hirsh Sawhney files a lockdown dispatch from New Haven, Connecticut, the uneasy home of Yale University; Arin Keeble talks us through the tricksy, rewarding and under-known work of Percival Everett; Lauren Kassel on the history of astrology,one of the oldest, most complex, intellectually powerful – and controversial – sciences Telephone by Percival Everett A Scheme of Heaven: Astrology and the birth of science by Alexander Boxer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

57 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Townies and gownies

‘How does it smell?’

The TLS’s philosophy editor Tim Crane guides us through a selection of reviews and essays from this week’s issue, including on the future of AI and what Thomas Hobbes, Susan Sontag, Montaigne and the trolley problem can tell us about our present predicament; the novelist Will Eaves re-reads Daniel Defoe’s A Journal of the Plague Year, “a caravan of episodes, made up of people going through the same horror in different ways”, and ponders a big-screen adaptation… See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

52 MIN2 w ago
Comments
‘How does it smell?’

Grotesquely good

Ian Buruma on the twentieth-century Italian writer Curzio Malaparte, a fascist and a fabulist with a hunger for war and a remarkable way of capturing it; Sue Stuart-Smithon gardening in the trenches of the First World War and the concept of horticultural therapy;to mark the 75th anniversary of VE Day, the TLS's history editor David Horspool talksus through a range of books, articles and essays covering the Second World War Selected books Diary of a Foreigner in Paris, by Curzio Malaparte, translated from the Italian and the French by Stephen Twilley The Well-Gardened Mind: The restorative power of nature, bySue Stuart-Smith Dresden: The fire and the darkness, by Sinclair McKay TheVolunteer: The true story of the resistance hero who infiltrated Auschwitz, by Jack Fairweather See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

59 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Grotesquely good

Easy as ABC?

James Waddell on the disorderly history ofalphabetic order;Beejay Silcox, who fled Cairo for Western Australia as the coronavirus spread, tells a tale of star-crossed lovers; Jordan Sand gives a short cultural history of mask-wearing A Place for Everything:The curious history of alphabetical order by Judith Flanders See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

55 MINAPR 30
Comments
Easy as ABC?

Godzilla, the plague, etc

Lawrence Douglas, in Massachusetts, on the presidential past, present and future of Donald Trump; Irina Dumitrescu, in Germany, on books as escape (attempt) and reading the plague into plague-free books; Lucy Dallas presents this month’s round-up of audio / visual offerings A Very Stable Genius: Donald Trump’s testing of America, by Philip Rucker and Carol Leonnig Unmaking The Presidency: Donald Trump’s war on the world’s most powerful office, by Susan Hennessey and Benjamin Wittes American Carnage: On the front lines of the Republican civil war and the rise of President Trump, by Tim Alberta See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

55 MINAPR 23
Comments
Godzilla, the plague, etc

‘It’s not him, it’s us’

William Shakespeare, the writer who – above all others, perhaps – keeps giving and giving. Michael Caines takes us through the latest research, theories and discoveries (or not, as the case may be); Why do women read more fiction than men? Lucy Scholes returns to the age-old conundrum Death by Shakespeare: Snakebites, stabbings and broken hearts by Kathryn Harkup Untimely Death in Renaissance Dramaby Andrew Griffin Shakespeare in a Divided America by James Shapiro Shakespeare and Trump by Jeffrey R. Wilson ‘Infecting the teller – The failure of a mathematical approach to Shakespeare’s authorship’ by Brian Vickers, in this week’s TLS Why Women Read Fiction: The stories of our lives by Helen Taylor See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

45 MINAPR 16
Comments
‘It’s not him, it’s us’

Introducing: Stories of our times

Today an edition of our new daily podcast - Stories of our times. Our new free daily news podcast takes you to the heart of the stories that matter, with exclusive access and reporting. Published for the start of your day, it is hosted by Manveen Rana and David Aaronovitch. If you want to hear more please search for Stories of our times and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. With reading on the rise under the lockdown, TLS editor Stig Abell suggests three books for a little escapism during these uncertain times. Stories of our times is the new daily podcast from The Times. Listen to more episodes here See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

31 MINAPR 14
Comments
Introducing: Stories of our times

‘A very peculiar telegram’

Ellen Crowell investigates an early-twentieth-century tale of doomed lesbian romance, decadent cryptography, morphine-induced suicide and more; Richard Smyth on the joys of bird-watching during lockdown; Michael Caines reads his poem “Decadence” See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

51 MINAPR 9
Comments
‘A very peculiar telegram’

The kangaroo curve

A recovering Alexander van Tulleken shares some thoughts on the British response to Covid-19; What cultural things are people doing to pass the time in isolation? We asked a selection of our writers, and Lucy Dallas joins us (from what sounds like a small tin box) to pluck at the results See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

53 MINAPR 2
Comments
The kangaroo curve

Latest Episodes

How to be alone

The poet and novelist Adam Foulds on the evolution of loneliness and its traditionally privileged cousin, solitude; Sam Leith on thrills, spills and racism in Willard Price’s children’sAdventureseries; Molly Guinness dips into 300-odd years of children’s books and finds leaden instruction, radical ideas and pure nonsense A History of Solitude by David Vincent A Biography of Loneliness: The history of an emotion by Fay Bound Alberti Discovering Children’s Books, the British Library online British Literature Catalogue, Peter Harrington See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

56 MIN6 d ago
Comments
How to be alone

Townies and gownies

Hirsh Sawhney files a lockdown dispatch from New Haven, Connecticut, the uneasy home of Yale University; Arin Keeble talks us through the tricksy, rewarding and under-known work of Percival Everett; Lauren Kassel on the history of astrology,one of the oldest, most complex, intellectually powerful – and controversial – sciences Telephone by Percival Everett A Scheme of Heaven: Astrology and the birth of science by Alexander Boxer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

57 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Townies and gownies

‘How does it smell?’

The TLS’s philosophy editor Tim Crane guides us through a selection of reviews and essays from this week’s issue, including on the future of AI and what Thomas Hobbes, Susan Sontag, Montaigne and the trolley problem can tell us about our present predicament; the novelist Will Eaves re-reads Daniel Defoe’s A Journal of the Plague Year, “a caravan of episodes, made up of people going through the same horror in different ways”, and ponders a big-screen adaptation… See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

52 MIN2 w ago
Comments
‘How does it smell?’

Grotesquely good

Ian Buruma on the twentieth-century Italian writer Curzio Malaparte, a fascist and a fabulist with a hunger for war and a remarkable way of capturing it; Sue Stuart-Smithon gardening in the trenches of the First World War and the concept of horticultural therapy;to mark the 75th anniversary of VE Day, the TLS's history editor David Horspool talksus through a range of books, articles and essays covering the Second World War Selected books Diary of a Foreigner in Paris, by Curzio Malaparte, translated from the Italian and the French by Stephen Twilley The Well-Gardened Mind: The restorative power of nature, bySue Stuart-Smith Dresden: The fire and the darkness, by Sinclair McKay TheVolunteer: The true story of the resistance hero who infiltrated Auschwitz, by Jack Fairweather See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

59 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Grotesquely good

Easy as ABC?

James Waddell on the disorderly history ofalphabetic order;Beejay Silcox, who fled Cairo for Western Australia as the coronavirus spread, tells a tale of star-crossed lovers; Jordan Sand gives a short cultural history of mask-wearing A Place for Everything:The curious history of alphabetical order by Judith Flanders See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

55 MINAPR 30
Comments
Easy as ABC?

Godzilla, the plague, etc

Lawrence Douglas, in Massachusetts, on the presidential past, present and future of Donald Trump; Irina Dumitrescu, in Germany, on books as escape (attempt) and reading the plague into plague-free books; Lucy Dallas presents this month’s round-up of audio / visual offerings A Very Stable Genius: Donald Trump’s testing of America, by Philip Rucker and Carol Leonnig Unmaking The Presidency: Donald Trump’s war on the world’s most powerful office, by Susan Hennessey and Benjamin Wittes American Carnage: On the front lines of the Republican civil war and the rise of President Trump, by Tim Alberta See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

55 MINAPR 23
Comments
Godzilla, the plague, etc

‘It’s not him, it’s us’

William Shakespeare, the writer who – above all others, perhaps – keeps giving and giving. Michael Caines takes us through the latest research, theories and discoveries (or not, as the case may be); Why do women read more fiction than men? Lucy Scholes returns to the age-old conundrum Death by Shakespeare: Snakebites, stabbings and broken hearts by Kathryn Harkup Untimely Death in Renaissance Dramaby Andrew Griffin Shakespeare in a Divided America by James Shapiro Shakespeare and Trump by Jeffrey R. Wilson ‘Infecting the teller – The failure of a mathematical approach to Shakespeare’s authorship’ by Brian Vickers, in this week’s TLS Why Women Read Fiction: The stories of our lives by Helen Taylor See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

45 MINAPR 16
Comments
‘It’s not him, it’s us’

Introducing: Stories of our times

Today an edition of our new daily podcast - Stories of our times. Our new free daily news podcast takes you to the heart of the stories that matter, with exclusive access and reporting. Published for the start of your day, it is hosted by Manveen Rana and David Aaronovitch. If you want to hear more please search for Stories of our times and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. With reading on the rise under the lockdown, TLS editor Stig Abell suggests three books for a little escapism during these uncertain times. Stories of our times is the new daily podcast from The Times. Listen to more episodes here See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

31 MINAPR 14
Comments
Introducing: Stories of our times

‘A very peculiar telegram’

Ellen Crowell investigates an early-twentieth-century tale of doomed lesbian romance, decadent cryptography, morphine-induced suicide and more; Richard Smyth on the joys of bird-watching during lockdown; Michael Caines reads his poem “Decadence” See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

51 MINAPR 9
Comments
‘A very peculiar telegram’

The kangaroo curve

A recovering Alexander van Tulleken shares some thoughts on the British response to Covid-19; What cultural things are people doing to pass the time in isolation? We asked a selection of our writers, and Lucy Dallas joins us (from what sounds like a small tin box) to pluck at the results See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

53 MINAPR 2
Comments
The kangaroo curve
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