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The Bay

KQED

21
Followers
125
Plays
The Bay

The Bay

KQED

21
Followers
125
Plays
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About Us

Every good story starts local. So that’s where we start. The Bay is storytelling for daily news. KQED host Devin Katayama talks with reporters to help us make sense of what’s happening in the Bay Area. One story. One conversation. One idea.

Latest Episodes

The Layers Of Protections for Police Who Use Violence

Californian police officers are rarely disciplined, even internally, when they do something wrong. That's what KQED reporters have learned by looking at records released under a law passed in 2018. The records show a system designed to protect police and discourage citizens from filing complaints in the first place. Guest:Sukey Lewis, KQED criminal justice reporter Tap here to see the California Reporting Project.

16 MIN1 d ago
Comments
The Layers Of Protections for Police Who Use Violence

It’s Been More Than 10 Years Since Oscar Grant — And Not Enough Has Changed

On Jan. 1, 2009, Oscar Grant was shot and killed by a BART police officer.The killing was recorded and the video went viral. There are so many other names here in California, too: Oscar Grant, Mario Woods, Stephon Clark, and many more. And each time, public outrage and pressure helped create some change. But it's never been enough. Guest: Alex Emslie, KQED criminal justice reporter

17 MIN3 d ago
Comments
It’s Been More Than 10 Years Since Oscar Grant — And Not Enough Has Changed

'The Weight of Living in a Racist World': Finding Emotional Support as a Black Man

This past week has been a lot. Several Bay Area cities joined other communities across the country protesting the police shooting of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Most of the demonstrations were peaceful, all of them were emotional. This past week has been a lot. Several Bay Area cities joined other communities across the country protesting the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Many of the demonstrations were peaceful, all of them were emotional. KQED reporters are following what’s happening all over the Bay Area. But for Black Americans everywhere, beneath all of this is trauma. And unless you’re Black, you can never fully know the depths of that trauma. So today, we're sharing an episode from our friends at KQED'sTruth Be Toldpodcast and making space for something that doesn't get talked about often: the mental health burdens of Black men. In thisepisode, Bakari Sellers, author and CNN commentator, Karamo Brown from “Queer Eye” and Ron Finley, the Gangsta Gardener, offer wisdom on meeting the needs of their hearts and minds as Black men in white America. We'll have more for you on the protests later this week. For the most up-to-date information on what's happening in the Bay Area, visit KQED's website.

46 MIN5 d ago
Comments
'The Weight of Living in a Racist World': Finding Emotional Support as a Black Man

What Disability Justice Activist Stacey Park Milbern Taught Us

Stacey Park Milbern was an expert at organizing people. A self-identifying queer disabled woman of color, Stacey organized to help her move from North Carolina to the Bay Area so that she could live independently as a disabled person. Stacey was a well known leader within the disability justice movement. And her activism extended beyond people living with disabilities and to other communities that are often excluded — people of color, queer folks, and people living on the streets. She passed away this month at the age of 33. Guest: Andraéa LaVant, Stacey’s friend and co-impact producer on the new Netflix documentary Crip Camp Tap the links to see conversations with Stacey from Sins Invalid, Disability Visibility Project, and the Barnard Center for Research On Women. For a full transcript of this episode, visit the web post here.

19 MIN1 w ago
Comments
What Disability Justice Activist Stacey Park Milbern Taught Us

What We Can Learn From Stockton’s Universal Basic Income Experiment

Since early 2019, 125 random Stockton residents have been receiving $500 a month to spend however they want. And while the final data hasn't been released yet, we're starting to learn a little more about how that money was spent. As many in the Bay Area struggle to pay rent or basic needs because of the coronavirus pandemic, what can we learn from this experiment in Stockton? Guest: Rich Ibarra, correspondent for Capital Public Radio and longtime Stockton resident

18 MIN1 w ago
Comments
What We Can Learn From Stockton’s Universal Basic Income Experiment

One Bay Area Filipina Nurse's Long History of Caring for People

When Evelyn Legarte migrated from the Philippines to the Bay Area in 1980, she was part of a growing number of Filipinos that now make up nearly 20% of nurses in California. Many of them are on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic and caring for people like they’ve done in public health crises before. Guest: Evelyn Legarte, retired Bay Area nurse

17 MIN2 w ago
Comments
One Bay Area Filipina Nurse's Long History of Caring for People

What Isolation During Ramadan Has Meant for Bay Area Mosques

Ramadan is an important time for mosques to receive donations that help them operate throughout the year. But fundraising is hard when people can't attend mosques to pray, be with people, and donate. While some Bay Area mosques have moved services online, the money hasn’t necessarily followed. And where a mosque is located and who it serves may determine whether they can adapt at all. Guest: Adhiti Bandlamudi, reporter for KQED’s Silicon Valley Desk

18 MIN2 w ago
Comments
What Isolation During Ramadan Has Meant for Bay Area Mosques

Campaigning And Voting In A Pandemic

This time of year is a critical point in the run up to the November elections. Normally, campaigns would spend the next few months organizing rallies, town halls and gathering signatures for ballot measures. But COVID 19 has thrown a wrench in the entire election ecosystem. And come Novevmber, even the process of voting will feel different, whether you're voting by mail or making the trip to do it in person. Guest:Marisa Lagos, KQED politics correspondent You can view our raw interview with Marisa in a live taping of this episode here, recorded Wednesday May 13.

20 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Campaigning And Voting In A Pandemic

People In Senior Care Homes Are Still Vulnerable Right Now

More than half of confirmed COVID-19 deaths in California come from senior care homes. And for family members and workers at these facilities, the situation hasn't gotten any less stressful. Guests: Jonathan Hirsch, CEO of Neon Hum Media, and Molly Peterson, KQED science reporter This is an update to our episode on April 10, 2020, which includes a longer introduction to Jonathan's dad, Thomas. Do you know someone in a nursing home or assistedfacility and want to share your story? Click here. And thanks to all of you who came to our (virtual) live taping Wednesday night. There's a recording on Facebook Live if you missed it.

18 MIN3 w ago
Comments
People In Senior Care Homes Are Still Vulnerable Right Now

How Virtual Learning Exposed Inequities In Education

Around 1.2 million California students lack adequate access to the internet right now, despite the fact that public schools have moved classes online. That's created a tough scenario for teachers who have a harder time keeping tabs on students, and some educators are worried about what this means to education inequities that existed long before COVID-19. Guest:Julia McEvoy, senior editor for KQED’s education and equity desk The Bay won a Regional Edward R. Murrow Award for Excellence in Innovation! Listen to our episode,“The Tiny Radio Station Relaying Critical Kincade Fire Information in Indigenous Languages.”Congratulations to KQED for winning six regional Murrow awards this year! We're hosting a live (virtual) taping of The Bay on Wednesday, May 13 at 5:30 pm. RSVP for freehere.

18 MIN3 w ago
Comments
How Virtual Learning Exposed Inequities In Education

Latest Episodes

The Layers Of Protections for Police Who Use Violence

Californian police officers are rarely disciplined, even internally, when they do something wrong. That's what KQED reporters have learned by looking at records released under a law passed in 2018. The records show a system designed to protect police and discourage citizens from filing complaints in the first place. Guest:Sukey Lewis, KQED criminal justice reporter Tap here to see the California Reporting Project.

16 MIN1 d ago
Comments
The Layers Of Protections for Police Who Use Violence

It’s Been More Than 10 Years Since Oscar Grant — And Not Enough Has Changed

On Jan. 1, 2009, Oscar Grant was shot and killed by a BART police officer.The killing was recorded and the video went viral. There are so many other names here in California, too: Oscar Grant, Mario Woods, Stephon Clark, and many more. And each time, public outrage and pressure helped create some change. But it's never been enough. Guest: Alex Emslie, KQED criminal justice reporter

17 MIN3 d ago
Comments
It’s Been More Than 10 Years Since Oscar Grant — And Not Enough Has Changed

'The Weight of Living in a Racist World': Finding Emotional Support as a Black Man

This past week has been a lot. Several Bay Area cities joined other communities across the country protesting the police shooting of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Most of the demonstrations were peaceful, all of them were emotional. This past week has been a lot. Several Bay Area cities joined other communities across the country protesting the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Many of the demonstrations were peaceful, all of them were emotional. KQED reporters are following what’s happening all over the Bay Area. But for Black Americans everywhere, beneath all of this is trauma. And unless you’re Black, you can never fully know the depths of that trauma. So today, we're sharing an episode from our friends at KQED'sTruth Be Toldpodcast and making space for something that doesn't get talked about often: the mental health burdens of Black men. In thisepisode, Bakari Sellers, author and CNN commentator, Karamo Brown from “Queer Eye” and Ron Finley, the Gangsta Gardener, offer wisdom on meeting the needs of their hearts and minds as Black men in white America. We'll have more for you on the protests later this week. For the most up-to-date information on what's happening in the Bay Area, visit KQED's website.

46 MIN5 d ago
Comments
'The Weight of Living in a Racist World': Finding Emotional Support as a Black Man

What Disability Justice Activist Stacey Park Milbern Taught Us

Stacey Park Milbern was an expert at organizing people. A self-identifying queer disabled woman of color, Stacey organized to help her move from North Carolina to the Bay Area so that she could live independently as a disabled person. Stacey was a well known leader within the disability justice movement. And her activism extended beyond people living with disabilities and to other communities that are often excluded — people of color, queer folks, and people living on the streets. She passed away this month at the age of 33. Guest: Andraéa LaVant, Stacey’s friend and co-impact producer on the new Netflix documentary Crip Camp Tap the links to see conversations with Stacey from Sins Invalid, Disability Visibility Project, and the Barnard Center for Research On Women. For a full transcript of this episode, visit the web post here.

19 MIN1 w ago
Comments
What Disability Justice Activist Stacey Park Milbern Taught Us

What We Can Learn From Stockton’s Universal Basic Income Experiment

Since early 2019, 125 random Stockton residents have been receiving $500 a month to spend however they want. And while the final data hasn't been released yet, we're starting to learn a little more about how that money was spent. As many in the Bay Area struggle to pay rent or basic needs because of the coronavirus pandemic, what can we learn from this experiment in Stockton? Guest: Rich Ibarra, correspondent for Capital Public Radio and longtime Stockton resident

18 MIN1 w ago
Comments
What We Can Learn From Stockton’s Universal Basic Income Experiment

One Bay Area Filipina Nurse's Long History of Caring for People

When Evelyn Legarte migrated from the Philippines to the Bay Area in 1980, she was part of a growing number of Filipinos that now make up nearly 20% of nurses in California. Many of them are on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic and caring for people like they’ve done in public health crises before. Guest: Evelyn Legarte, retired Bay Area nurse

17 MIN2 w ago
Comments
One Bay Area Filipina Nurse's Long History of Caring for People

What Isolation During Ramadan Has Meant for Bay Area Mosques

Ramadan is an important time for mosques to receive donations that help them operate throughout the year. But fundraising is hard when people can't attend mosques to pray, be with people, and donate. While some Bay Area mosques have moved services online, the money hasn’t necessarily followed. And where a mosque is located and who it serves may determine whether they can adapt at all. Guest: Adhiti Bandlamudi, reporter for KQED’s Silicon Valley Desk

18 MIN2 w ago
Comments
What Isolation During Ramadan Has Meant for Bay Area Mosques

Campaigning And Voting In A Pandemic

This time of year is a critical point in the run up to the November elections. Normally, campaigns would spend the next few months organizing rallies, town halls and gathering signatures for ballot measures. But COVID 19 has thrown a wrench in the entire election ecosystem. And come Novevmber, even the process of voting will feel different, whether you're voting by mail or making the trip to do it in person. Guest:Marisa Lagos, KQED politics correspondent You can view our raw interview with Marisa in a live taping of this episode here, recorded Wednesday May 13.

20 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Campaigning And Voting In A Pandemic

People In Senior Care Homes Are Still Vulnerable Right Now

More than half of confirmed COVID-19 deaths in California come from senior care homes. And for family members and workers at these facilities, the situation hasn't gotten any less stressful. Guests: Jonathan Hirsch, CEO of Neon Hum Media, and Molly Peterson, KQED science reporter This is an update to our episode on April 10, 2020, which includes a longer introduction to Jonathan's dad, Thomas. Do you know someone in a nursing home or assistedfacility and want to share your story? Click here. And thanks to all of you who came to our (virtual) live taping Wednesday night. There's a recording on Facebook Live if you missed it.

18 MIN3 w ago
Comments
People In Senior Care Homes Are Still Vulnerable Right Now

How Virtual Learning Exposed Inequities In Education

Around 1.2 million California students lack adequate access to the internet right now, despite the fact that public schools have moved classes online. That's created a tough scenario for teachers who have a harder time keeping tabs on students, and some educators are worried about what this means to education inequities that existed long before COVID-19. Guest:Julia McEvoy, senior editor for KQED’s education and equity desk The Bay won a Regional Edward R. Murrow Award for Excellence in Innovation! Listen to our episode,“The Tiny Radio Station Relaying Critical Kincade Fire Information in Indigenous Languages.”Congratulations to KQED for winning six regional Murrow awards this year! We're hosting a live (virtual) taping of The Bay on Wednesday, May 13 at 5:30 pm. RSVP for freehere.

18 MIN3 w ago
Comments
How Virtual Learning Exposed Inequities In Education
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